Tag Archives: music

Buddy

I’m a big time Buddy Holly fan. There’s no hiding that. However, for as much as I truly enjoy his music and get chills every time I hear “Oh boy!” and “Smokey Joe’s cafe”, I really didn’t know too much about him.

For instance, did you know that, when it came to the infamous “day the music died” crash of 1959, it was actually Waylon Jennings who traded seats with Buddy Holly? Jennings was a bassist in Holly’s back-up band, The Crickets, and he gave up his seat on the plane.

Holly joked to Jennings: “I hope your ol’ bus freezes up!”  Jennings shot back with, “Well, I hope your ol’ plane crashes!”

I had no idea the two were so close. Always quite fascinating when you realize yet another way the early music world was connected. Seems like it’s so much more expansive now.

Also, it always blows my mind just a litte to hear someone from the past speaking in an interview.

Paul McCartney narrated The Real Buddy Holly story. You can watch it in segments, or of course rent via Netflix, etc.

My Centennial

100 posts

Hard as it is to believe that I am just now arriving at my own little sweet centennial, and wordy though I may be, I’m going to attempt at keeping this short and sweet. Happy blogging centennial to me! And in celebration of finally garnering a smidge of street cred, I’m going to top this entry off with a few things that have, as of late, made me just sublimely happy (if only for an instant).

This song

It’s positively transcendent. The album version is different than the video; a bit more refined, and with a lot more vitality (oddly enough). Her voice is old and traditional, playful and warm at the same time. The song just gives me the giddies on the insides each time I hear it. I got a tad disappointed, however, to walk into an Urban Outfitters the other day and hear it blaring from the sound system. Money for the band though, and all that blah blah blah.

Miles Davis’ Container Gardening Tips

This, coming from the king of cool and jazz, not only cements his “cool-dom” further, but also paints such a vivid picture of his imagination and the life he lived. I just plain chuckle every time I read this through.

As originally credited from Ryan Abbott

1. Don’t feed them garbage This is a pretty simple concept, so heed it. If you feed your container plants shit—polluted rainwater, cheap fertilizer, ash from your hash pipe—they will not flourish, your buds will not bloom. Like I said to my bass player Paul Chambers last night, “You got to cool it with the booze and drugs.” The same is true of your garden.

Because they don’t talk much we forget that plants are living things, organic beings that need nourishment to survive and thrive. I recommend a quality fertilizer, delivered sparingly, with restraint. Just a few drops for every quarter-gallon of water and before you know it your azaleas will be laughing with color. Literally, laughing. You got to be careful you don’t overdo it, in fact, because azaleas will take their partying to the limit, and after a few days you’ll find yourself leaning out your window at three o’clock in the morning yelling at them to shut up because their flower orgy is keeping you awake.

2. Play music to your plants Music heals all wounds except those inflicted by a hunting knife, so I like to play music to my plants. What do I play? People stop me on the street to ask me that all the time. What’s my answer? Usually it’s, “Leave me alone and go buy my albums,” or a variation thereof.

In my experience, annuals tend to appreciate the complexity of classical piano concertos, like those by Ravel or Rachmaninoff. I play records by those two over and over again, my speakers aimed out to the backyard, blaring through a hole in the screen door torn by a high John Coltrane one morning when he thought he was a rabid polar bear, which he was not.

My vegetables—tomatoes and pole beans and eggplants—like to be sung to. I think it helps the fruit ripen—sweetly sung melodies that rise and fall like crooked branches, scales that float on the warm humidity of the July sky. Like my sister Dorothy says, “Soak their roots in song and they will grow, my brother. They will grow.”

3. Don’t throw your plants down the stairs Not throwing things down stairs does not come naturally to me—it is something I’ve had to work at. That’s what life is all about: challenging yourself to rise above your essence, while staying true to your character. Of course, the hard part is knowing what about yourself needs changing, and what you should accept and embrace and blow on with the full force of your diaphragm.

Maybe you got upset by Columbia Records not giving you the $5000 advance you deserved and reacted by tossing a Blue Velvet orchid in an authentic 15th century Ming vase down a flight of stairs where it shattered on a marble landing, tossing potting soil into the shark tank. Perhaps you felt you were within your rights as an artist to do so, but in the process you have removed from this world two items of great beauty. Three, if you damaged the marble.

Like most living things, container plants prefer to be upright the majority of the time. They also need good containers with good drainage. My favorite material is terra cotta, which is fragile but has an earthy vibe that complements most urban container gardens. While throwing plants down stairs doesn’t always kill them, it rarely makes them stronger. Most often it just makes one hell of a mess for the housekeeper.

4. Give your plants space This is it, this is the most important tip, so wrap it in tissue paper and take it out of here when you go. The space around everything is more precious than the items occupying the space.

Space is what defines matter, gives it a shape, a silhouette. It’s true of music, true of art, true of container plants. Without room to move among the vines, how can you discover fruit? How can you get close enough to smell the singularity of a flower if it is among hundreds? Silence ripens our attention to sound. Negative space makes positive.

Some people pack their gardens tight: cluttered clematis and hydrangeas in noisy bands of color, herbs upon herbs upon herbs … a symphony of shit. Don’t get me wrong, color is fine; color is life. But if you can’t walk through your garden without puking, what good is it for?

The space around your plants is what defines them. Save that space, relish it, drink it in. Give your plants room to walk, to be seen and heard, to develop deep and hungry roots with their own space to explore and invent, the freedom to create new shades and shapes, arms that reach through the empty air to carve fresh pockets in which to build an entirely new kind of fruit or flower. A type never tasted, something unheard of.

This Photograph

I really can’t explain why it hits such a note every time I look at it, but more than anything I just get an overwhelming sense that everything is going to be ok- and this clear memory of a sandy beach on a warm sunny day. I also love the quality of motion that it depicts.

Fret ye not, there is so much more to come.

Currently Browsing:

Since I’ve got about twelve tabs open in Firefox (a personal low, actually) and it is leading to some seriously slow browsing/typing/working/etc., I figured I’d just share what’s hanging around, instead of bookmarking them for the sake of investigating them later.

The sun is apparently the dimmest it has been for nearly a century. That is some seriously unsettling news. (Previous imaging showed many sun spots; currently, they see…none.)

who_poster

Who Does She Think She Is? is a film I stumbled upon via friend of a friend sort of ways and haven’t had the time to investigate how or where I might see it. But it seems so intriguing as it investigates that dilemma that I’ve been faced with ever since I decided to have a serious career- a fear that’s been snowballing for quite some time now- is it really possible to have it all? How do female creatives make it work? If I find out anything further, I’ll post it.

My current Pandora station is still a little rough around the edges, but I’m working on a good mix of Delta Blues. You can enjoy it here. The image above is from the Mississippi Delta Blues and Heritage Festival Page. If only I had the time and money to get wild and crazy- I absolutely love me some Delta Blues.

Typographica is back! I am especially enticed by their book reviews because I absolutely love being able to touch my type.

I stumbled upon Kosher Porkchops the other day via Yes and Yes and have been laughing ever since. Particularly insightful and “inspiring” were “But it has a face!“, “Don’t order the fish” and “Things I have done in the line of duty“. Head on over and peruse. I guaranty you’ll at least chuckle once at what you find.

Wishing

I were in posession of tix to this May show:

Back from hiatus! Sort of…

Olympus Pen came in the mail today, along with my copy of MADE YOU LOOK! I’ll have more details soon. Also, the Canon FT QL I scooped up (nay, rescued) from Goodwill for ten bucks. AND some of the first shots from my new SX-70. All, soon, very soon. Patience is a virtue? I’m off to make stir fry and play the copy of Zeppelin III we found at the beach (not on the beach, oddly enough) in preperation for tomorrow’s Stairway show. Be there or be square.

Visualizing sound

This concept is executed in such a minimal and refined fashion that, for once, I can actually ‘see’ the songs it depicts. I’ve always had trouble with the oft-practiced “draw what you hear” assignment and its many iterations. This seems to accomplish that aim quite gracefully.

A disc cover whose display contains a 1-inch square representation of each song’s corresponding wave depiction. Yum.

(Via.)

Not Enough Sunshine In Your Wednesday?

Matt and Kim’s Daylight should do the trick:

If not, try the Ruby Suns’ palmitos park.